IN SPITE OF GREAT ADVANCES IN FORMAL METHOD IN SOCIAL SCIENCE, MUCH OF THE UNDERSTANDING OF PERSISTING AND GENERAL RELATIONSHIPS DEPENDS UPON A GRASP THAT IS TOTALLY INDEPENDENT OF SOME FORMAL METHOD. IN ADVANCING SOCIAL SCIENCE, WE INVENT AND PRACTICE TECHNIQUE AND CULTIVATE A HUMANISTIC ART. (Robert Redfield)

TOPICS (Number of Posts)

Abuse of Science (24) Adivasi (38) Africa (10) Alien Anthropology (80) America (56) Ancient Civilizations (113) Anthropology (162) Anunnaki (38) Archaeology (74) Atlantis (23) Awareness (73) Ayahuasca (13) Babylon System (29) Belief Systems (20) Biology (30) Black Magic (14) Brainwashing (16) Carlos Castaneda (8) Ceremonies (22) Consciousness (79) Conspiracies (70) Corporation (24) Cosmos (23) Cultural Anthropology (90) Docu Drama (10) Earthlings (42) Education (23) Entertainment Industry (17) Entheogenic Shamanism (39) Ethnographic Film (31) First Contact (10) Freedom to Fascism (37) Freemasonry (16) Global Conspiracy (37) Gods (17) Graham Hancock (7) Haimendorf (6) Hidden History (58) Hidden Universe (42) Homosapiens (38) Hopi Prophecy (12) Human Democracy (24) Human Rights (50) Human Sexes (9) Illuminati (10) India (16) Indigenous People (89) Intelligence (23) Love (17) Magic Mushrooms (6) Malinowski (6) Margaret Mead (7) Matrix of Power (85) Media Control (23) Mind Control (32) Mining (15) MK-Ultra (11) Mother of Mankind (8) Music Videos (10) Native American Prophecy (17) Native Americans (17) Nature (32) New World Order (18) Occultism (12) Origin of Life (11) Passages Of Life (7) Political Anthropology (25) Psychedelics (16) Psychology (38) Reptilian Agenda (50) Rights of Indigenous People (40) Sacrificial Cannibalism (7) Satanism (17) Secret Mysteries (64) Shaman Credo Mutwa (10) Shamanism (56) Sixth Sense (16) Social Evils (18) South America (15) Spiritual Archaeology (18) Subversion (45) The Elder Brothers' Warning (14) Tribal Films (22) Tribes Of India (21) Tribes of the Deccan (8) Visual Anthropology (138) Visual Anthropology Resources (13) Voodoo (8) We Are All One (50)

ADIVASI (Tribes of India) Ethnographic Films by SATHYA MOHAN PV

Showing posts with label Homosapiens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Homosapiens. Show all posts

Monday, May 23, 2016

What Makes Us Human?


What is it that makes us human?

Is it that we love, that we fight?

That we laugh?

Cry?

Our curiosity?

The quest for discovery?

Driven by these questions, filmmaker and artist Yann Arthus-Bertrand spent three years collecting real-life stories from 2,000 women and men in 60 countries.

Working with a dedicated team of translators, journalists and cameramen, Yann captures deeply personal and emotional accounts of topics that unite us all; struggles with poverty, war, homophobia, and the future of our planet mixed with moments of love and happiness.




September 11, 2015

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Study finds that Ancient Aztecs and Incas are genetically related to people from Siberia


5 April 2016

After nearly a century of speculation and theories, an international team of geneticists has obtained conclusive evidence proving that the Incas and Iroquois are closely related to people of Altai, a Siberian region that borders China and Mongolia.

The study proves how ancient Aztec’s, Incas, possibly Pre-Inca cultures, Iroquois and other natives of the Americas are closely related to people near the villages of Altai in Russia.

According to a study performed by a group of international geneticists, ancient civilizations such as the Aztecs, the Incas, Iroquois and other American cultures are closely related to villages of Altai, a Russian region located between Siberia, China, and Mongolia. However, the idea that these people are related isn’t a new theory and has already been considered as a possibility by numerous researchers dating back a century at least.

The idea that people from Siberia and surrounding area migrated through northeastern Russia and Alaska, to America, is something that has been suspected for a century by numerous researchers. However, until today, no one had managed to prove it. Now, thanks to Russian geneticist Oleg Balanovski, this migratory theory has been scientifically corroborated.

Dr. Balanovsky’s research also proved that some Native Americans have kinship with the indigenous populations of Australia.

“The current study confirms the theory that the Altai peoples are closely related to Native Americans,” said geneticist Valery Ilyinsky at the RAS Institute of General Genetics. ”We now have clear proof, and it is useless to contest it.”

Through the comparative study of Native Americans and their Siberian ancestors, contrasted with the rest of the world, researchers were able to establish that the ancestors of Aboriginal peoples, like the Aztec and Inca, arrived at the ‘New World’ possibly over 30 thousand years ago, from Siberia.

However, the results of the study led to another great discovery:

“Besides Siberian ancestors, some Native Americans showed a puzzling relation to the indigenous peoples of Australia and Melanesia in the Pacific Ocean,” remarked Dr. Balanovsky. “This is astounding because they are located in an almost opposite part on the planet.”

It is somewhat surprising, as these regions are almost diametrically opposed, “says Balanovski.

A HUGE landbridge connecting continents

According to rbth.com, Scientists already know how humans traveled to the Americas from Altai. “Instead of the Bering Strait there was a land bridge [30,000 years ago], because during the Ice Age much water was locked in glaciers and the level of the world’s oceans was lower,” Dr. Balanovsky explained.

He added that it’s still not clear whether migration from Australia and Melanesia to the Americas was direct across the ocean, or by going up along the coast and via the Aleutian Islands. Archaeologists continue to study this issue.

Featured image credit: Alamy/Legion Media

Monday, July 13, 2015

We are the Aliens

Clouds of alien life forms are sweeping through outer space and infecting planets with life. The idea that life on Earth came from another planet has been around as a modern scientific theory since the 1960s when it was proposed by Fred Hoyle and Chandra Wickramasinghe. At the time they were ridiculed for their idea -- known as panspermia. But now, with growing evidence, it's back in vogue and even being studied by NASA.

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

The Hidden Truth About Human Origins and History

Forbidden Archeology

The Hidden Truth About Human Origins & History - Michael Cremo.

Cremo states that the book has "over 900 pages of well-documented evidence suggesting that modern man did not evolve from ape man, but instead has co-existed with apes for millions of years!",and that the scientific establishment has suppressed the fossil evidence of extreme human antiquity. Cremo identifies as a "Vedic archeologist", since he believes his findings support the story of humanity described in the Vedas. Cremo's work has garnered interest from Hindu creationists, paranormalists and theosophists. He says a knowledge filter (confirmation bias) is the cause of this suppression. The Hidden Truth About Human Origins & History - Michael Cremo Forbidden Archeology.

The claim is that humans have lived on the earth for millions of years and that the scientific establishment has suppressed the fossil evidence of extreme human antiquity. Much of the material used and many of the quotes given are taken from the end of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th. As well relying on older more unreliable scientific work, the authors make arguments based on the Veda. In contrast to the Christianity-based creation Science movement, this book's style of creationism is based on steady state type of belief which is viewed as being compatible with the Vedas, namely that humans have existed in their current state for hundreds of millions of years.

Friday, March 27, 2015

Century of Enslavement: The Federal Reserve

What is the Federal Reserve system? How did it come into existence? Is it part of the federal government? How does it create money? Why is the public kept in the dark about these important matters? In this feature-length documentary film, The Corbett Report explores these important question and pulls back the curtain on America's central bank.

Sunday, May 4, 2014

The Mountain of Mystery

by Planet Doc Full Documentaries
February 5, 2014
from YouTube Website
 
In this documentary we travel to the oldest place on Earth. Here lies the largest, most intact virgin forest in the world, on the Guayana Massif, in the south of Venezuela, along the Brazilian border.

In the interior of this green world lost in time, live men intimately adapted to their jungle environment which, though fascinating, is full of dangers. They are the inhabitants of the jungle, who live alongside and respect the endless different life forms around them.
 
Their culture is ancient, almost as ancient as the landscape in which it has developed.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

20 Incredible TED Talks for Anthropology Majors

Because anthropology involves a breakneck collision course between so many different subjects, students with broad interests find it an absolutely thrilling major. Not like anyone can blame them, really; the multifaceted concepts behind human evolution and culture open up some intriguing, sometimes scary, truths about what it means to be a member of mankind. Seeing as how TED just so happens to harbor similar goals, plenty of its famous, stimulating Talks series feature lectures of interest to the anthropological community. A small sample of its rich intellectual bounty can be found here, but seeking out some of their other offerings will do nothing but help supplement lessons and pique eager minds.

1) Zeresenay Alemseged looks for humanity’s roots: This TED Talk sends viewers to Ethiopia on a paleoanthropological journey digging for truths behind mankind’s ancient origins. Zeresenay Alemseged shares the stunning true story of his team’s excavation of the oldest known child skeleton. A discovery that might very well open more doors toward better understanding our biological history.


2) Aubrey de Grey says we can avoid aging: Step from humanity’s past to one option in its multiple-choice future, courtesy of a respected Cambridge professor. Likening aging to a degenerative disease, he believes that the right science can reverse, even “cure,” the natural process, and describes the benefits of doing so. Time will ultimately reveal this mindset’s true outcome, but it certainly provides nourishing food for thought today. 


3) Wade Davis on endangered cultures: An enviable position with National Geographic granted Wade Davis the extraordinarily rare opportunity to immerse himself in indigenous and marginalized societies worldwide. His multimedia TED Talk exposes audiences to these threatened peoples, often displaced and threatened thanks to imperialism and globalization. It’s a somber look at a tragic anthropological reality for tens of millions (if not hundreds of millions) worldwide. 


4) Nicholas Christakis explains how social networks predict epidemics: Today’s anthropologists should probably pay attention to the role social media plays in forming cliques and subcultures. As Nicholas Christakis’ thorough research reveals, mapping Facebook, Twitter, and the like actually provides the quickest conduit for tracking the spread of everything from diseases to creative ideas. Suffice it to say, valuable (if not life-altering) applications for this technology exist beyond the anthropological realm. 


5) Jane Goodall discusses what separates us from apes: Because biology and evolution make up a significant chunk of a future anthropologist’s education, paying attention to one of the world’s most pre-eminent primatologists is essential. After a lifetime among Tanzanian chimpanzees, Jane Goodall marveled at the eerie parallels between humans and their closest genetic relatives. But at least one glaring departure exists, revolving around differences in language and communication complexities. 


6) Dan Dennett: Cute, sexy, sweet, funny: Such simple, though often subjective, concepts like those in the title actually involve some seriously complex social and biological constructs. Though, scarily enough, the latter doesn’t always exactly gel with the former. In fact, sometimes one’s physical wiring declares the exact opposite of the philosophical.


7) Nina Jablonski breaks the illusion of skin color: In a TED Talk sure to spark some controversy and discussion, Skin author Nina Jablonski harnesses NASA’s TOMS7 satellite to draw conclusions about pigmentation and UV exposure. She notes some interesting points about UV rays’ role in darkening skin, and believes that the phenomenon eventually infiltrated humans at the genetic level. It’s compelling science, to be certain, and one anthropology students should keep in mind as their studies progress. 


8) A.J. Jacobs’ lives biblically for a year: Anthropology majors nurturing a healthy interest in religion and its role in inspiring humanity toward both good and evil will undoubtedly find this particular lecture fascinating. Here, they can explore one journalist’s attempts to spend an entire year following the Bible literally, and the resulting internal and external stresses. Considering the topical nature of fundamentalism and ensuing cultural and political controversies, his insight might very well prove beneficial in the long run.


9) Chris Abani muses on humanity: This Nigerian activist’s modus operandi is simple, straightforward, and noble: “to chronicle, to share and to document stories about people.” This also happens to be the core goal of the entire anthropological community. Chris Abani collects stories the way some people collect baseball cards, and he shares some here that uphold humanity’s dignity without paying lip service to its more sinister corners. 


10) Spencer Wells builds a family tree for humanity: Even though the human race boasts incredible genetic diversity these days, that coding had to start programming itself somewhere. This TED Talk by Spencer Wells, the National Geographic Society’s genographic project head, discusses how he’s currently working backwards to discover the biology every human on earth currently shares. For anthropology students and anyone else fascinated by the life sciences, his lecture is a satisfying mental treat. 


11) Rodney Brooks says robots will invade our lives: Because mankind’s machines have left an indelible impact on its evolutionary, social, and cognitive development since pretty much the beginning, it stands to reason that they’ll continue to do so forever. These days, robots infiltrate so many facets of daily life in the First World, many people can’t visualize a future without them. And though this TED Talk hails from the dark ages of 2003, much of what it has to offer still applies to contemporary times. 


12) Louise Leakey digs for humanity’s origins: Another amazing anthropological lecture inquiring about the beginnings of modern humans, this time coming from the Rift Valley and Lake Turkana. Here, mysteries about Homo erectus and other species who may have eventually spawned us battle it out for scientific dominance. After all, “until 30,000 years ago, at least three upright walking apes shared the planet Earth,” so right now, the real ancestor could be any one of them, or one that continues to remain unknown. 


13) Kevin Bales advises us how to combat modern slavery: Slavery has plagued humanity since ancient eras, and continues netting millions of billions of dollars annually, particularly when it comes to labor and sex. Kevin Bales’ research, which he shares here, exposes the tragic, inhumane reality behind some of the world’s wealthiest industries. And then he tells viewers exactly what needs doing to ensure equitable economic treatment for all the world’s peoples. 


14) Amber Case claims we are all cyborgs now: Technological advances in communications, particularly cell phones and the internet, will inevitably lead to evolutionary changes to accommodate them more and more in our daily lives. Whether or not this turns humanity into “Terminator” or useless blobs with “external brains” is anyone’s guess, but anything’s possible. Regardless, though, anthropologists will inevitably end up dealing with the aftermath, so they may as well start preparing now.


15) Robert Sapolsky shares the uniqueness of humans: TED frequently shares its favorite videos from around the web, and one particularly human-centric example comes straight from Stanford University’s Class Day in 2009. Primatologist Robert Sapolsky hilariously skewers the human animal and its often inexplicable behavior patterns. It certainly makes you wonder what the rest of the world’s biomass makes of such curious bipedal creatures.
 

16) Stefana Broadbent discusses how the Internet enables intimacy: Social media critics frequently lambast the isolationist components of the Internet, but cognitive scientist Stefana Broadbent heartily disagrees. Her two decades’ worth of research regarding communication via cell phone, instant messaging, social networks, and more lead her to believe that they actually encourage individuals to stay connected with one another. Loved ones separated by distance or time can use these available tools to foster closeness rather than staying apart or constantly waiting for correspondence. 


17) Aaron Huey looks at America’s native prisoners of war: America’s inhumane, brutal treatments of indigenous peoples is a well-known, but tragically under-addressed, atrocity. Aaron Huey’s photographs of the shocking, impoverished conditions at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation showcase how such historical injustices continue stretching into contemporary times. The suffering of the Lakota people summarizes how horrifically imperialism’s marginalization hits native civilizations and serves as a clarion call toward social action. 


18) Devdutt Pattanaik: East vs. West — the myths that mystify: Despite frequent interactions (and an extended period of British exploitation), India and “Western” society still manage to perpetuate myths and misunderstandings about one another. Drawing from his experiences as Future Group’s Chief Belief Officer, Devdutt Pattanail explains that these assumptions likely stem from religious roots. Although this TED Talk expresses a businessman’s perspective, his insights resonate far beyond the boardroom. 


19) James Watson on how he discovered DNA: James Watson and Francis Crick built upon Rosalind Franklin’s research to unlock the scientific reality of DNA — although only the first two received any sort of recognition for it. Nevertheless, the story remains one of the most important in life science history, and its relevance to anthropology should be self-evident. Majors and non-majors alike should still sit and marvel over the triumphs, drama, and tragedies behind piecing together the mysteries driving living matter. 


20) Adam Ostrow: After your final status update: Archaeologists and anthropologists of the past (and today, obviously) dig through ancient dirt to discover as many truths about human culture and evolution as they can. Those in the future will have completely different territory to excavate: the digital landscape. Social media sites unwittingly serve as virtual memorials to the deceased, providing a first-person view of contemporary cultural memes.

Friday, August 5, 2011

What Are We Really Made Of ?



Hosted by Morgan Freeman, Through the Wormhole will explore the deepest mysteries of existence - the questions that have puzzled mankind for eternity. What are we made of? What was there before the beginning? Are we really alone? Is there a creator? These questions have been pondered by the most exquisite minds of the human race. Now, science has evolved to the point where hard facts and evidence may be able to provide us with answers instead of philosophical theories. Through the Wormhole will bring together the brightest minds and best ideas from the very edges of science - Astrophysics, Astrobiology, Quantum Mechanics, String Theory, and more - to reveal the extraordinary truth of our Universe.

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

BBC - One Night In Bhopal



The Bhopal disaster (also referred to as the Bhopal gas tragedy) is the world's worst industrial catastrophe. It occurred on the night of December 2--3, 1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. A leak of methyl isocyanate gas and other chemicals from the plant resulted in the exposure of hundreds of thousands of people. Estimates vary on the death toll. The official immediate death toll was 2,259 and the government of Madhya Pradesh has confirmed a total of 3,787 deaths related to the gas release. Other government agencies estimate 15,000 deaths. Others estimate that 3,000 died within weeks and that another 8,000 have since died from gas-related diseases.[3][4] A government affidavit in 2006 stated the leak caused 558,125 injuries including 38,478 temporary partial and approximately 3,900 severely and permanently disabling injuries.

UCIL was the Indian subsidiary of Union Carbide Corporation (UCC). Indian Government controlled banks and the Indian public held 49.1 percent ownership share. In 1994, the Supreme Court of India allowed UCC to sell its 50.9 percent share. The Bhopal plant was sold to McLeod Russel (India) Ltd. UCC was purchased by Dow Chemical Company in 2001.

Civil and criminal cases are pending in the United States District Court, Manhattan and the District Court of Bhopal, India, involving UCC, UCIL employees, and Warren Anderson, UCC CEO at the time of the disaster. In June 2010, seven ex-employees, including the former UCIL chairman, were convicted in Bhopal of causing death by negligence and sentenced to two years imprisonment and a fine of about $2,000 each, the maximum punishment allowed by law. An eighth former employee was also convicted but died before judgment was passed.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Greatest Evolution Discoveries


1. K-T Asteroid Theory of Dinosaur Extinction (1980)
Walter Alvarez postulates that high levels of iridium found in rock core samples around the world provide evidence that an asteroid impact caused the extinction of dinosaurs. Iridium, a common mineral found in asteroids, was discovered in the clay layer at what is known as the K-T boundary. This layer, at 65 million years, lies between the rocks of the Cretaceous and the Tertiary periods and coincides with the mass extinction of dinosaurs.
2. First Dinosaur Fossils Identified (1820s -- 1840s)
In 1822, geologist William Buckland uncovers some really big teeth in England. At the time, there is no word to describe his finds. Twenty years later, in 1842, Sir Richard Owen comes up with the word "dinosaur" to describe several spectacular creatures whose fossils are discovered across England. Megalosaurus is the first dinosaur ever named.
3. Potential for Life Created (1953)
Graduate student Stanley Miller, combining the ideas of other scientists, reproduces the early atmosphere of Earth by creating a chamber containing only hydrogen, water, methane and ammonia. He boils the water and exposes the elements to an electric discharge like lightning, simulating Earth's early processes. After a week, Miller finds organic compounds have formed, including some amino acids, the "building blocks of life."
4. New Life-forms Discovered Around Hydrothermal Vents (1977)
Bob Ballard and the crew of the submersible Alvin find amazing new life-forms living completely independent of the sun's energy around deep-sea, hydrothermal vents. These undersea geysers form along volcanic mid-ocean ridges, where cold seawater penetrates deep into cracks in the Earth's crust. Heated water rises back out and the scalding vent water mixes with cold ocean-bottom seawater, creating a rising plume of warm, black fluid filled with mineral particles. The chemicals support a thriving ecosystem on the ocean floor.
5. The Burgess Shale (1909)
Charles Walcott exposes a mother lode of Cambrian fossils high in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, providing a glimpse of what life was like on Earth more than 500 million years ago. He collects more than 65,000 specimens and classifies each, discovering that the fossils are ancestors of living animals.
6. Classification of Species (1735)
Carl Linnaeus, considered the "father of taxonomy," develops a system for naming, ranking and classifying all forms of life that is still in use today (although many changes have been made). The Linnaean system, based on shared physical characteristics, uses a hierarchy starting with kingdoms divided into classes, then into orders, families, genera and species.
7. Theory of Natural Selection (1858)
Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, in which he challenges contemporary beliefs about the creation of life on Earth. Darwin had served as an unpaid naturalist on the HMS Beagle, which set out on a five-year scientific expedition to the Pacific coast of South America in early 1832. The data he collected on the expedition, especially specimens from the Galapagos Islands, was the inspiration for his theories on evolution by the mechanism of natural selection. His work has been at the center of controversy ever since it was published.
8. Australopithecus Afarensis or "Lucy" (1974)
Donald Johanson discovers the partial skeleton of a 3.2 million-year-old female hominid in Ethiopia. Johnson dubs his find "Lucy" after the Beatles' song Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds, which was playing on the radio as the team celebrated the find.
9. Laetoli Footprints (1978)
A team led by Mary Leaky discovers fossilized Australopithecus footprints in Laetoli, Tanzania. The footprints, dated to 3.5 million years ago, were formed when two individuals walked over wet volcanic ash that had hardened like cement. These human ancestors had perfect, two-footed strides, indicating that the hominids walked upright.
10. Toumai skull (2002)
Michel Brunet unearths the oldest hominid fossil to date in the desert of the central African nation of Chad. The fragments of this 6 to 7 million-year-old skull, with characteristics resembling humans, were found outside eastern and southern Africa, suggesting human evolution may have been taking place all across the continent.

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Origins of the Races of Earth


Michael Tellinger talking about racial diversity and the origins of human genetics on earth.

Friday, April 1, 2011

Symbols of an Alien Sky

PART-1

PART-2

PART-3

PART-4

PART-5

PART-6

David Talbott's film 'Symbols of An Alien Sky' goes far beyond merely identifying "the celestial provocation" of our true history.
Symbols resurrects and confirms the genius of Immanuel Velikovsky. With excruciating attention to detail Talbott rivals the intellectual obsession and integrity of the thousands of ancient chroniclers that are "urging us to remember."
The credibility of Symbols is uniquely formidable as it firmly connects the library of the Stone Age to the Modern Age cosmology of leading edge plasma physicists Anthony Peratt, Wal Thornhill and others.
With erudition Symbols defines an overdue and not-so-subtle challenge to modern institutional assumptions, promoted and guarded by the gamut from religion to politics to academia and beyond.
As such Talbott's most fundamental accomplishment in 'Symbols of an Alien Sky' is the reconnecting of global humanity to itself, to its true history, and what that reconnection implies for our future peace and well-being.